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Wish you were here? Seeing the Supermoon over Hilo Saturday (May 5)

20120505_Supermoon


By Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

The Supermoon with St. Joseph Catholic Church in the foreground in Hilo. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

The Supermoon with St. Joseph Catholic Church in the foreground in Hilo. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

The full Moon has been blamed for many things true, false and questionable. The moon raises high tides, it makes dogs howl,  it makes roosters crow, it wakes you up at night with beams of light coming through bedroom windows, it brings out the Manta Rays off the Kona Coast, it makes people act wacky and brings out werewolves.

On Saturday night (May 5) the full Moon was a “super Moon,” as much as 14% bigger and 30% brighter than all other full Moons of 2012. And from the photographs we’ve seen online lots of folks went outside to get a glimpse or photograph it themselves.

The scientific term for the phenomenon is “perigee moon.” Full Moons vary in size because of the oval shape of the Moon’s orbit. The Moon follows an elliptical path around Earth with one side (“perigee”) about 50,000 km closer than the other (“apogee”). Full Moons that occur on the perigee side of the Moon’s orbit seem extra big and bright.

Hilo provided relatively clear skys for some early Supermoon viewing Saturday night. We caught the Supermoon over St. Joseph Catholic Church in Hilo before some clouds moved in. Because the moon is so bright photography and video showing any detail of the moon can be challenging to get something else in the images.

We hope you enjoy this view from the Big Island in Hawaii.

2 Responses to “Wish you were here? Seeing the Supermoon over Hilo Saturday (May 5)”

  1. Trinidad A. Williams says:

    Wonderful time-lapse of the Supermoon over Hilo’s skies ~ Baron! Enjoyed the sounds’ – so like the islands’ diversity … I got to enjoy the view here over the AZ desert skies ~ just as awesome!

    • Baron says:

      Actually that’s not a time-lapse movie it’s shot in real-time. The moon really does move that fast across the sky and the clouds moved in at the end.

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Nov 21, 2014 / 5:15 pm

 

 

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