Tag Archive | "volcano watch"

At about 07:00 a.m. HST, Fissure 17 as shown from the air. The HVO field crew reported that the spattering height and intensity at Fissure 17 seemed to have intensified slightly from yesterday, but the length of active spattering in the fissure is shorter. The overall vigor of Fissure 17 appears to have dropped over the past two days, accompanying a stalling of the Fissure 17 flow front. Photo taken Thursday, May 17, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: Turn to the USGS and other trusted sources for Kīlauea eruption info

False rumors about the ongoing volcanic activity at the summit and lower East Rift Zone of Kīlauea Volcano are causing unnecessary anxiety and confusion.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 17, 2018

Twenty earthquakes were reported felt in Hawaii during the past week. Some were aftershocks associated with the magnitude-6.9 earthquake on May 4, 2018.

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Earthquakes with a magnitude of 2 or greater from May 4-11, 2018. Map courtesy IRIS/Google Maps/Google Earth

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 11, 2018

Fifty earthquakes were reported felt in Hawaii during the past week. Many were aftershocks associated with the magnitude-6.9 earthquake on May 4.

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Volcano Watch: It’s an extraordinary time on Kīlauea Volcano!

The breaking news of this past week is about Kīlauea Volcano’s summit eruption.

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Volcano Watch: What a day! Eruptions, earthquakes, and a lower lava lake

Kīlauea really started rocking and rolling Friday (May 4). It began with a magnitude-5.4 earthquake, an hour later, a magnitude-6.9 earthquake, the strongest quake to strike Hawaiʻi since 1975.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 6, 2018

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake level dropped with summit deflation, and was about 160 m (525 ft) below the vent rim as of May 5 at 9:30 p.m. HST.

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On Tuesday night (April 24), between around 8:30 p.m. and 11:00 p.m., Kīlauea Volcano's summit lava lake overflowed once again. This photo, taken around 10:30 p.m., shows the large overflow as it spread west (to the right) from the lava lake onto the floor of Halema‘uma‘u. The bright (yellow-white) spot is spattering along the south margin of the lava lake. USGS photo by M. Patrick. Photo taken Tuesday, April 24, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: A busy time at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone

The magmatic plumbing system extending from the summit reservoir to Puʻu ʻŌʻō is pressurizing.

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Beginning around midnight on Saturday, April 21, Kīlauea Volcano's summit lava lake rose high enough that lava briefly spilled onto the floor of Halema‘uma‘u. Since then, additional overflows occurred in four pulses on April 22–23. The largest one occurred during the fourth pulse, which started at 6:30 a.m. today (Monday, April 23) and continued for about three hours, covering about a third of the crater floor with shiny black lava. Early this morning, HVO geologists (shown here) used a laser range-finder to measure the depth to the lava lake surface at its peak level. The silhouettes of HVO and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's Jaggar Museum are visible on the rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera (center high point). Mauna Loa can be seen in the far distance (left). The area around Halema‘uma‘u remains closed to the public due to ongoing volcanic hazards, including high sulfur dioxide gas emissions and unexpected rockfalls and explosions. Photo taken Monday, April 23, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 26, 2018

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake level fluctuated with summit inflation and deflation, eventually rising high enough to overflow onto the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu multiple times beginning Saturday, April 21.

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Overflows from the perched lava pond within west pit, a small crater adjacent to the main Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater on Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone, continue to build up the levees around the pond. The rising level of the perched lava pond during the past month is a sign of the increasing pressure within the magma system beneath Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. This overflow, captured by a USGS-Hawaiian Volcano Observatory time-lapse camera, occurred on April 17, 2018. Photo taken Tuesday, April 17, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: Do recent changes herald the opening of a new vent on Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō?

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō appears to be at a critical juncture, and USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists are closely monitoring it and will provide updates if and when conditions change.

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An HVO geologist photographs an active pāhoehoe breakout after taking a lava sample nearby. Photo taken Friday, April 13, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 19, 2018

On the East Rift Zone, the 61g lava flow remained active with breakouts on the upper part of the flow field.

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Ballistics from the explosion impacted a few of the solar panels which power the monitoring equipment on the rim of Halema‘uma‘u. Photo taken Friday, April 6, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 12, 2018

At 10:28 a.m. Friday morning (April 6), rock falls from the Overlook crater wall into Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake triggered an explosive event which hurled spatter (molten lava fragments) and lithic blocks (older crater wall) onto the rim

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 5, 2018

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake level fluctuated with summit inflation and deflation, ranging about 24–30 m (79–98 ft) below the vent rim.

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Most of the lava flow (dark black) produced by the April 1868 Mauna Loa eruption can be seen in this aerial photo on the west (left) side of the prominent fault scarp, known informally as the Kahuku pali (formal names are Pali o Mamalu for the upper half and Pali‘okūlani for the lower half of the scarp). The large littoral cone that formed during the eruption, now named Pu‘uhou, is visible on the lower left coastline. Kalae (South Point) is not visible, but is to the right of the photo. The summit areas of Mauna Loa and Kīlauea volcanoes can be seen in the distance. Aerial photo: U.S. Geological Survey, 1954.

Volcano Watch: Disaster strikes Ka‘ū in 1868 – The rest of the story

Already reeling from a destructive earthquake, tsunami, and mud flow in 1868, Kaʻū residents on the Island of Hawaiʻi hoped for a reprieve, but it was slow to come.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for March 29, 2018

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake level fluctuated with summit inflation and deflation, ranging about 23–35 m (75–115 ft) below the vent rim.

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