Tag Archive | "volcano watch"

The active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater about 3 weeks before magma began to withdraw from beneath the crater. Visible in the middle left of the photo behind the plume, is the old Overlook parking area, closed since 2008. The parking area slumped into the crater by June 21. View is toward the southwest. USGS photo on April 13, 2018, by Lil DeSmither.

Volcano Watch: How does the current activity at Kīlauea caldera stack up against those of other volcanoes worldwide?

We are currently witnessing extraordinary events at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano.

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Fissure 8 in Leilani Estates. Photo taken Friday, July 6, 2018 courtesy of Hawaii County Fire Department.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 5, 2018

On Kilauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone, lava from the fissure 8 spatter cone continues to flow in an established channel to the Kapoho coastline. Minor overflows from the channel occur periodically.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 28, 2018

On Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone, lava from the fissure 8 spatter cone continues to flow in an established channel to the Kapoho coastline.

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A generalized graphic of how a collapse/explosion event sequence can occur. The upper graphic represents a cross-section of the crater filled with rock rubble and the lower graphic is an example of a typical number of earthquakes observed during a particular phase of the collapse/explosion cycle. Initially, the piston is supported by the magma reservoir. It is stable and there is very low seismicity. Second, as magma drains, stress on the faults increases and there is an earthquake swarm on the caldera ring faults. Third, the piston collapses down from its own weight. A large collapse earthquake occurs and a plume can result. Graphic credit: Brian Shiro

Volcano Watch: What causes the collapse/explosion events at Kīlauea’s summit?

What is causing these earthquakes? The short answer is that the rigid rock of the caldera floor is responding to the steady withdrawal of magma from a shallow reservoir beneath the summit.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 22, 2018

On Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone, lava from the fissure 8 spatter cone continues to flow in the established channel to the Kapoho coastline.

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View of cinder cones in the Northeast Rift Zone near the summit of Mauna Loa. View to the north-northeast with Mauna Kea in the background. Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843, most recently erupting in 1975 and 1984. Photo credit: Matt Patrick, USGS

Volcano Watch: Mauna Loa Back to Normal

Earthquakes at Mauna Loa have diminished and deformation has slowed, indicating that the volcano is no longer at an elevated level of unrest.

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A volcanic gas cloud over the LERZ on May 19, 2018 – In this picture, the sun is illuminating the volcanic gas plume from behind. The plume appears orange in color, as the blue component of the sunlight has been preferentially removed by scattering on tiny sulfate aerosols. This looks a bit like a sunset, but note that the meteorological clouds below the volcanic plume do not show this discoloration. Photo credit: Christoph Kern, USGS

Volcano Watch: Colorful plumes – can we see volcanic gases?

When volcanic gases are released into the atmosphere, resulting plumes sometimes appear to have a faint color. Is this color indicative of a certain gas present?

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This image is from a temporary research camera positioned near Kapoho looking southwest. From left to right, one can see the eruptive fissures, with Fissure 15 on the far left, and Fissure 8 near the center. Webcam image taken Sunday, June 17, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 17, 2018

On Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone, lava continues to erupt from fissure 8. As of June 17, lava fountains were feeding a well-established channel flowing east toward the ocean entry in the Kapoho Bay area.

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Volcanic ash from an eruption at the summit of Kīlauea on May 17, 2018. Left: This low magnification photo shows ash particles ranging from a few microns to a couple millimeters in diameter. Right: A high-powered scanning electron microscope reveals great detail on this basalt ash shard. Photos courtesy of Pavel Izbekov, UAF-GI AVO.

Volcano Watch: How to protect yourself from volcanic ash produced by Halema‘uma‘u explosions

Ash in the quantities we expect should mostly be a nuisance, but it can be harmful to humans, animals and the environment. Health effects include irritation to the eyes, nose, throat, and skin.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 7, 2018

On Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone, lava continues to erupt from an active fissure system. As of June 7, fissure 8 lava fountains were feeding a lava channel flowing east towards the ocean entry in the Kapoho Bay area.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 1, 2018

Additional explosive events at Kilauea summit that could produce minor amounts of ash fall downwind are possible at any time. Volcanic gas emissions at the summit remain high.

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An aerial view of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano captured from an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) overflight video on May 31, 2018. Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park to collect visual information on this changing eruption site. Scientists will examine the video footage in detail to understand the evolution of the expanding collapse area and assess hazards at Kīlauea’s summit. Credit: U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Aviation Services, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

Volcano Watch: Kīlauea Volcano – What’s new and what’s not

With the current activity at the volcano’s lower East Rift Zone and summit, it’s an understatement to say that Kīlauea has been making worldwide headlines the past month.

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Panorama of Lower East Rift Zone Webcam at 7:06 a.m. Thursday, May 24, 2018. Image courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 24, 2018

At Kῑlauea’s summit, multiple explosions continue to occur daily, with some sending plumes of ash up to 8,000 feet above sea level or higher.

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When molten lava encroaches on grassland, forests, or other vegetated land, subsurface pockets of natural gas from the burning plant material can ignite, causing a blast known as a “methane explosion.” To avoid this hazard, keep a safe distance—at least tens of yards—from the margin of an active lava flow in vegetated areas. USGS photo.

Volcano Watch: Molten lava plus vegetation can create hazardous explosions

With lava now advancing through lush vegetation along Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone, methane explosions have become a concern.

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