Tag Archive | "usgs"

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for March 15, 2019

Kīlauea is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

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The seismic waveform of the March 13, 2019 earthquake measured at the Volcano Golf Course by the USGS.

USGS: Magnitude-5.5 earthquake on Kīlauea Volcano’s south flank, March 13, 2019

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-5.5 earthquake located beneath Kīlauea Volcano’s south flank on Wednesday, March 13, at 12:55 a.m., HST.

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Volcano Watch: How is lava flow thickness measured and why does it matter?

During the first few years of Kīlauea Volcano’s Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption, episodic high lava fountains produced multiple lava flows. After each event, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists measured its thicknesses.

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USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists installed a new battery in a summit webcam that provides a view into Halema‘uma‘u. Images from K3cam can be viewed on HVO's website at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/webcam.html?webcam=K3cam. USGS photo: J. Kauahikaua, 03 March 2019.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for March 7, 2019

Deformation signals are consistent with refilling of Kīlauea Volcano’s deep East Rift Zone (ERZ) magma reservoir.

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This ‘a‘ā flow erupted from fissure 8  on Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone on June 1, 2018, shows how the interior of a lava flow remains incandescently hot even though surface cooling forms a crust of solid rubble. Based on studies of lava flow cooling rates, it will take more than 130 days for a flow this thick (about 4.5 m, or 15 ft) to cool to a temperature of about 200 degrees Celsius (290 degrees Fahrenheit). USGS photo by A. Lerner.

Volcano Watch: How do lava flows cool and how long does it take?

Since the end of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption questions have surfaced concerning how long it will take for the new lava flows to solidify.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for February 28, 2019

Kīlauea is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

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A USGS pilot and Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemist prepare to conduct a test flight of an unmanned aerial system (UAS) on Kīlauea Volcano in November 2018. This UAS was outfitted with a prototype miniaturized multi-gas sensor for the detection of volcanic gases emitted by Kīlauea, including sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide. USGS photo by Patricia Nadeau.

Volcano Watch: Low sulfur emissions mean a new focus on a different volcanic gas

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) smells are still sometimes detected around the island, but it’s another gas emitted by Kīlauea that has become more important lately—carbon dioxide (CO2).

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Photo taken Tuesday, February 19, 2019 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for February 21, 2019

Deformation signals are consistent with refilling of Kīlauea Volcano’s deep East Rift Zone (ERZ).

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for February 14, 2019

Deformation signals are consistent with refilling of Kīlauea Volcano’s deep East Rift Zone. Sulfur dioxide emission rates in the lower ERZ have been below detection limits since early September 2018.

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Volcano Watch: Why do some Hawaii earthquakes occur so far offshore?

Seismologists call these events “flexural earthquakes” to reflect their cause (bending of the Pacific Plate).

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for February 7, 2019

Kīlauea is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

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Fissure 8 reactivates in late May and becomes the dominant vent in the LERZ eruption.

Volcano Watch: Geology of the past, how long will the eruption last?

How did scientists evaluate how long the Kilauea Eruption would last in 2018?

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Kilauea Caldera. USGS/HVO image

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for January 31, 2019

Kīlauea is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

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Volcano Watch: Seven months of no lava at Puʻu ʻŌʻō heralds end of an era

One of the most frequent questions asked of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) scientists the last several months has been, “Is the Lower East Rift eruption over?”

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