Tag Archive | "lava flow"

New fissures have erupted in Leilani Estates and lava output has increased. Photo taken at 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 6, 2018. Photo by Steven Royston | Special to Hawaii 24/7

Kilauea Eruption: More fissures erupt in Leilani Estates, at least 26 homes lost as of Sunday (May 6)

Since the onset of this eruption, a total of 10 fissures have emerged, and at least 26 homes have been destroyed as of May 6, 2018.

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Steam rises off the active lava flow in a rainstorm. File Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO.

Noxious fumes surround hikers, tour guide dead as three escape

Fire/rescue responded to an 8:15 a.m. alarm Thursday (Feb 1) to the Kalapana lava viewing area in the old Royal Gardens Subdivision to rescue hikers from noxious fumes.

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LavaTalk: Kilauea Volcano status for Sunday (Sept 18)

The 61g lava flow, extending southeast from Puʻu ʻŌʻō on Kīlauea’s south flank, continues to supply lava to the ocean near Kamokuna.

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During today's overflight of Kīlauea Volcano's "61g" lava flow, the ocean entry appeared less robust, with only one small flow of active lava streaming over the sea cliff. The second, smaller ocean entry point, west of this main entry (noted in our July 29 photo), was not active at the time of the overflight. Photo taken Tuesday, August 2, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Kilauea’s 61g lava flow ocean entry is slowing, breakouts continue on land

The western portion of the ocean entry was not active during observations yesterday, such that its span was narrowed to about 492 feet since July 29.

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This morning, slow-moving pāhoehoe lava toes and lobes continued to break out from the active flow that crossed the "emergency route" gravel road on Kīlauea Volcano's south flank. Viewing these active breakouts requires a long (8-10 miles, round trip) and hot hike. It is essential for anyone attempting the hike to carry 2-3 quarts of drinking water per person. Sturdy shoes and sun protection (hat, sunglasses, sunscreen) are highly recommended. Early morning or late evening hikers should also carry a flashlight and extra batteries. For more safety info, please visit http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/ and https://www.nps.gov/havo/learn/photosmultimedia/lava-safety-video.htm Photo taken Saturday, July 30, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Visitors to the active lava flow should be prepared for a long, hot and dusty hike

Viewing the active breakouts requires a long (8-10 miles, round trip) and hot hike. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is waiving their entrance fee on Monday (Aug 1) to celebrate the centennial of their establishment.

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Tip of 61G lava flow is 0.4 miles from coastal emergency road and is active

As of midday Friday (July 15), the 61G lava flow front was about 730 m (0.4 miles) from the coastal emergency road and 870 m (0.5 miles) from the ocean. The leading tip of the flow was active on Friday and the area around the flow tip has widened.

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Puʻu ʻŌʻō southeast lava flow about a mile from the ocean

When mapped on Tuesday afternoon (July 5), the lava flow front had advanced nearly 0.5 miles since Monday; the flow front was about 1.1 miles from the ocean.

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Two arrested for trespassing after going to lava flow, may have poked flow with golf clubs

Shortly before 6 p.m. Thursday (October 30), police responded to a report of two persons who were in the vicinity of an active lava flow located above Pāhoa town. Upon arrival, officers observed a man and a woman facing the flow within five feet of the lava and taking pictures. They were in possession of […]

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A closer look at the stream of lava pouring into the deep ground crack on Monday (Sept 1). Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: HVO scientists are closely watching Kīlauea—and Mauna Loa

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is closely tracking the Kīlauea lava flow, which is threatening residential areas in the Puna District of the island.

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Lava flows into the Pacific Ocean at sunrise in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Wish you were here? Sunrise at the lava flows

Lava flows into the Pacific Ocean at sunrise in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

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