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Ash rises above Halemaʻumaʻu within Kīlauea’s summit caldera in this May 27, 2018, telephoto image from near Volcano House Hotel in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. By the time Kīlauea’s summit collapse events ended on August 2, Halema‘uma‘u was 2.5 km (1.5 mi) wide and 500 m (1600 ft) deep; prior to the 2018 collapses, it was about 1 km (0.5 mi) wide and 85 m (about 280 ft) deep. A segment of a long-closed Park trail is visible winding across the caldera floor (lower left). USGS photo by K. Anderson.  

Volcano Watch: New insights gained from Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 summit collapses

A year ago, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and Island of Hawaiʻi residents were in the throes of an historically unprecedented series of events for Kīlauea.

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Scientists use a laser diffraction particle size analyzer to examine fine ash from the 2018 Kīlauea summit explosions. The research examines fine ash (grains 1 mm to 1 micrometer) and investigates the processes of eruption, fragmentation, and respiratory health hazards (PM10, PM2.5). USGS image by A. Van Eaton

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 9, 2019

Scientists use a laser diffraction particle size analyzer to examine fine ash from the 2018 Kīlauea summit explosions.

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Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption was monitored around the clock by field crews of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and other USGS scientists for three months, starting with the first fissure that erupted in Leilani Estates on May 3, 2018. Clockwise from upper left, USGS-HVO scientists walked along Leilani Avenue on May 6 to examine spatter erupted from fissures 5-6; documented the fast-moving lava flow as it exited the fissure 8 vent; photographed the fissure 8 lava channel on June 2; and measured the temperature of a fuming ground crack in Leilani Estates on May 9. USGS photos.

Volcano Watch: HVO geologists recall their first day of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption 

With the one-year anniversary of the Lower East Rift Zone eruption, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory staff, are reflecting on this historic event.

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A small collapse of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater at 6:14 a.m. HST today (May 1, 2019) was the last 'hurrah' for a GPS instrument located on the crater's edge (red circle). This station, designated PUOC, served faithfully throughout Kīlauea's 2018 eruption and was an important source of information on the shallow magma system of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. The station's last reported position showed it moving rapidly to the southeast, consistent with motion into the crater (inset shows data transmissions from April 11 through this morning). Monitoring of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō is currently being accomplished by additional GPS and tilt stations farther from the edge of the crater. The larger equipment installation near the solar panels was not affected by this morning's collapse and continues to function. However, contingency plans are in place in case collapses of the crater edge continue. USGS photo by I. Johanson on March 18, 2019, annotated on May 1, 2019.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 2, 2019

Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL.

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The rescued dog from a cliffside in the Honolii area. Photo courtesy of HFD.

Dog rescued Monday (April 29) off Hilo cliffside

Fire/rescue responded to a 9:43 a.m. alarm to the end of Kahoa Street in the Honolii area of Hilo to rescue a dog.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 25, 2019

Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL.

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During the first two weeks of Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption, fissures were characterized by low eruption rates and small flows. This was because the erupted lava originated from pockets of cooler, less fluid magma stored in the rift zone. Later fissures erupted hotter, more fluid magma, resulting in higher eruption rates and large, fast-moving lava flows, like that erupted from the fissure 8 cone (lower right), shown here on July 29, 2018. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Volcano Watch: What we’ve learned from Kīlauea’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption

May 3, 2019, marks the one-year anniversary of the start of Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption.

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Damage survey on Crater Rim Drive. NPS Photo by Jessica Ferracane.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park recaps repair work ahead the anniversary of Kīlauea caldera’s summit collapse

As the anniversary of the 2018 Kīlauea eruption nears, staff at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continue efforts to repair and reopen trails, roads and more.

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This image is from a temporary monitoring camera on the west rim of Kilauea Caldera. The camera is looking E towards the bottom of the newly enlarged Halemaʻumaʻu crater, although the deepest part of the crater is not visible from this vantage point. The crater from left to right (roughly NNE to SSW) is approximately 1 km (0.6 mi) across. The depth of the crater in the visible image from the rim is several hundred meters.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 18, 2019

Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL.

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Earthquakes (red dots) track the progression of the magmatic intrusion from Kīlauea Volcano's middle East Rift Zone to the lower East Rift Zone between April 30 and May 3, 2018. Orange triangles show the locations of fissure 1 (right), which erupted on May 3, and Puʻu ʻŌʻō (left). The earthquakes shown here are well-located with magnitudes less than 3.5 and depths shallower than 7 km (4.3 miles). USGS graphic.

Volcano Watch: What caused—or did not cause—the 2018 Kīlauea eruption?

The USGS has been asked if the eruption was caused by or related to geothermal drilling and energy production on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone.

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A high-precision GPS unit (on white “T” in foreground) records its position at a ground control point along Pohoiki Road. This marker was painted in July 2018 and is visible in numerous aerial photographs taken by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists throughout Kīlauea’s lower East Rift Zone eruption last summer. GPS data are recorded over a period of four minutes at each location, enabling vertical precision of approximately 18 cm (7 in). USGS photo by M. Zoeller, 03/22/2019.

Volcano Watch: Recent ground control survey helps finalize USGS lava thickness map

Some lava thicknesses on the preliminary map were slightly overestimated, while others were underestimated.

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A telephoto view of the sulfur deposits forming on the walls of Halema‘uma‘u. USGS photo by C. Parcheta, 04/02/2019.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 11, 2019

Sulfur dioxide emission rates on the ERZ and at Kīlauea’s summit remain low and have been steady over the past several months.

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Only small amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are currently being released from Kῑlauea, but they chemically react with each other (oxidation-reduction reaction) to form the bright yellow sulfur deposits visible on the crater walls within Halemaʻumaʻu. The current low sulfur emission rates at Kīlauea have contributed to beautifully clear skies in downwind areas. USGS photo by M. Poland, 03/22/2019.

Volcano Watch: Eruption pause provides an opportunity to probe volcanic pollution

The end of Kīlauea’s 2018 eruption was accompanied by an enormous decrease in the amount of sulfur dioxide gas (SO2) emitted from the volcano. This has led to beautifully clear skies.

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HVO geologists (one shown here for scale) examined Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 lava flow near Isaac Hale Beach Park on March 29. This part of the lower East Rift Zone fissure 8 flow is mostly "toothpaste lava"—an informal name for secondary spiny pāhoehoe lava that oozed out from the stalled primary ‘a‘ā flow that reached the coast. This lobe, classic toothpaste lava, is about 3-4 m (9–13 ft) thick and about 70 m (76–77 yds) long. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 4, 2019

Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

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