Kilauea Eruption: PGV still working to seal wells, lava flows and ash eruption Thursday (May 24)

Hawaii County Civil Defense interactive map of roadblocks, subdivisions, and eruption fissures: hawaii247.com/lavamap

USGS Resources related to the 2018 Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone eruption and Summit Activity

Kīlauea Eruption Information Resources: www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-rela…

Kilauea Summit Explosive Ash Eruption

Poor weather at the summit of Kīlauea has obscured views of Halema‘uma‘u for much of today, but a brief break in the weather around noon allowed HVO's webcam to capture this image of an ash plume rising from the crater at 12:17 p.m. HST. Even though weather has obscured visual observations of the ongoing summit explosions, HVO scientists are able to track them using signals from monitoring instruments, such as seismometers. Photo taken Thursday, May 24, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Poor weather at the summit of Kīlauea has obscured views of Halema‘uma‘u for much of today, but a brief break in the weather around noon allowed HVO’s webcam to capture this image of an ash plume rising from the crater at 12:17 p.m. HST. Even though weather has obscured visual observations of the ongoing summit explosions, HVO scientists are able to track them using signals from monitoring instruments, such as seismometers. Photo taken Thursday, May 24, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

An ash cloud rises over Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Thursday, May 24, 2018. Photo courtesy of Pamela Mizuno.

An ash cloud rises over Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Thursday, May 24, 2018. Photo courtesy of Pamela Mizuno.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that an ash eruption at the Kilauea summit occurred at about 6 p.m.  The resulting ash plume reached 10,000 feet high and may affect the surrounding areas.  The wind may carry ash to the southwest toward the Pahala area.

Due to the volcanic activity, the following is provided for your awareness:

  • If you are at home, stay indoors with the windows closed.  If you are outside, seek cover.
  • If you are in your car, keep the windows closed.  Ash fallout may cause poor driving conditions, due to limited visibility and slippery driving conditions.  Drive with extreme caution, or pull over and park.
  • After the hazard has passed, do check your home, and especially your catchment system for any impact that may affect your water quality.

Lower East Rift Zone Kilauea Eruption Update

May 23, 2018 Fissures 5 & 6 Going Off from Mick Kalber on Vimeo.

Video courtesy of Tropical Visions Video with air transportation by Paradise Helicopters.


Compilation of three short videos from helicopter overflights of the fissure complex, in Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone on May 22, 2018. Fissure 22 is the dominant fissure, with lava fountaining to 50 m (about 160 ft) or more in height.


Time-lapse movie of Kilauea’s Lower East Rift Zone in Puna. The camera is positioned near Kapoho looking Northwest. From left to right on the horizon, one can see Puʻu ʻŌʻō vent near the left edge of the image, the gas plume from Halemaʻumaʻu crater (when clear enough), with Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea farther to the right. May 17-24, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


This footage is from an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) hovering near fissure 22 during the overnight hours of May 22, 2018, and looking down on the fountaining fissure complex. The view rotates upward (to the south) to track channelized lava as it flows toward the Pacific Ocean, about 3 mi (5 km) away. The ocean entry is in the distance, recognizable by a small plume. The USGS National Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project Office is assisting with remote data collection and mapping of lava flows and hazards. UAS flights into hazardous areas allow USGS scientists to safely view, document and better understand what’s happening with Kīlauea’s rapidly changing eruption and to provide information to Hawai‘i County Civil Defense and emergency officials. Video courtesy of the U.S. Department of the Interior Office of Aviation Services.


This video was filmed on May 21, 2018, with a UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle). Limited UAV flights above the hazardous Kīlauea summit area, which is currently too dangerous for geologists to enter for ground observations, are conducted with permission from the National Park Service. The overflights collect visual information on what is happening at this rapidly changing vent. The information is used to quantify change and informs our assessment of hazards, which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. At Kīlauea Volcano’s summit, a nearly continuous plume of gas and steam billows out of the Overlook vent and drifts with the wind. Explosions are occurring about two times a day, producing ash that rises to a height of between 8,000 to 10,000 feet above sea level. Small ash emissions occur more frequently. The larger explosions produce ash that is blown downwind, and trace amounts have fallen in nearby communities.

Map as of 2:20 p.m. HST, May 24. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960, and 2014-2015.

Map as of 2:20 p.m. HST, May 24. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960, and 2014-2015.

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:15 pm on Thursday, May 24. Two channelized lava flows are reaching the ocean. In addition, a new lava flow is active in Leilani Estates subdivision, near Fissure 7. The black and white area is the extent of the thermal map. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas. The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. The base is a copyrighted color satellite image (used with permission) provided by Digital Globe.

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:15 pm on Thursday, May 24. Two channelized lava flows are reaching the ocean. In addition, a new lava flow is active in Leilani Estates subdivision, near Fissure 7. The black and white area is the extent of the thermal map. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas. The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. The base is a copyrighted color satellite image (used with permission) provided by Digital Globe.

This is a Civil Defense Message for 12 noon, Thursday, May 24, 2018.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports eruption activity continues in the Lower East Rift Zone. The middle portion of the fissure system continues to be the most active.

There are currently three lava flows entering the ocean between Pohoiki Bay and MacKenzie State Park (Highway 137 mile markers 12 to 14). Lava eruption continues in the area of Leilani Estates and Lanipuna Gardens from Fissure 22, which is feeding the two other ocean entries.

Fissure 7 reactivated this morning and is actively fountaining lava. The flow is moving towards the east into Leilani Estates. So far, it has covered Kaupili and Mohala Streets, between Leilani Avenue and the fissure line. The flow continues to be active.

Due to frequent ash emissions at the Kilauea summit and increased sulfur dioxide emissions, residents should take action to limit exposure.

Due to the volcanic activity, the following policies are in effect:

  • Be aware of the laze hazard and stay away from any ocean plume.
  • Residents down rift of the lava flows should be prepared to voluntarily evacuate at a moment’s notice.
  • For more information about the ocean entries and the most up-to-date maps, visit the USGS Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory’s website: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/k…
  • Residents can learn more about current sulfur dioxide emission levels and forecasts by visiting the University of Hawaii’s Vog Measurement and Prediction Project website: mkwc.ifa.hawaii.edu/vmap/hyspl…

Frequent ash emissions continue at the Kilauea summit. Take action to avoid exposure to ash.

To help our residents, we are distributing free masks for ash protection:

  • Distribution runs today and tomorrow from 3:30-7:30 p.m., and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Masks will be distributed at Ocean View Community Center, Naalehu Community Center, Pahala Community Center, Cooper Center, and Shipman Gym in Keaau.
  • Each person may receive up to three masks.
  • Masks do not protect against gasses and vapors. They will only provide filtering for ash.

Due to the current activity, residents down rift should be prepared to voluntarily evacuate at a moment’s notice. Stay alert to messages issued by Civil Defense.

Due to unsafe conditions, the following policies are in effect:

  • Kalapana and Kapoho Roads are open to residents only. Identification is required.
  • Highway 130 is open to local traffic with steel plates over roadway cracks.
  • Highway 137 is closed to all traffic between Kamaili Road and Pohoiki Road.
  • Kamaili Road is closed to all thru traffic.

Due to the lava entry at the ocean, the following policies are in effect:

  • Access to the area is prohibited due to the laze hazard.
  • Stay away from any ocean plume since it can change direction without warning.
  • The U.S. Coast Guard is actively monitoring the ocean entry area and enforcing a 300-meter standoff zone. Only permitted tour boats are allowed in the area.
  • Health hazards of laze include lung, eye and skin irritation.
  • Be aware that the laze plume travels with the wind and can change direction without warning.
  • Tankers are providing drinking water in Vacationland & Kapoho.
  • For those evacuating, the Pahoa Community Center, Keaau Community Center, and Sure Foundation Church are open.  Food will be provided and the shelters are pet-friendly.

For your information:

  • HELCO advises Leilani Estates residents to be aware of downed power lines.  Always assume the lines are active and exercise extreme caution.

A third shelter has opened.  Sure Foundation, located on Pohaku Circle in Keaau, is now open.

  • People from Pahoa who have breathing concerns are relocating from the Pahoa Community Center shelter to the Sure Foundation shelter. The shelter will cater specifically to people with breathing issues, but everyone is welcome.

Get the latest Vog Predictions here: mkwc.ifa.hawaii.edu/vmap/

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) and Vog

Click on image for a full description of air quality levels.

Click on image for full description of air quality levels.

Volcanic gas emissions remain elevated throughout the area downwind of the vents in lower Puna.

  • Severe conditions may exist such as choking and inability to breathe.
  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) gas from fissures are especially dangerous for elderly, children/babies and people with respiratory problems.

County, State, and Federal partners continue to monitor the situation. You will be informed of any conditions that affect your safety.

Monitor vog levels and forecasts: People on Hawaii Island outside the area of volcanic activity are also advised to monitor levels of vog at vog.ivhhn.org

The residents of Puna are going through a very difficult time.  We ask for your help and understanding.

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