Kilauea Eruption: Volcanic eruptions continue with toxic fumes in Leilani Estates Saturday (May 5)


Fissure eruption on Luana Road, between Leilani and Malama, in the Leilani Estates subdivision, at 9:37 p.m. HST on May 5, 2018. Fountains reached heights of up to 100 m (about 330 feet). Video by Bruce Houghton, USGS and University of Hawaii.

Vent sites in Leilani Estates subdivision on Saturday, May 5, 2018. The area has been evacuated due to fumes, fire and lava hazards. Photos by Steven Royston | Special to Hawaii 24/7

Vent sites in Leilani Estates subdivision on Saturday, May 5, 2018. The area has been evacuated due to fumes, fire and lava hazards. Photos by Steven Royston | Special to Hawaii 24/7

Hawaii County Civil Defense 6:15 p.m. audio message

This is a Civil Defense update for 6:15 p.m., Saturday, May 5, 2018.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory confirms no new outbreaks have emerged and the fissures continue to emit hazardous fumes in Leilani Subdivision at this time.

It is confirmed that at this time, 5 homes have been destroyed.

Due to the eruption, the following are issued:

  • Leilani Estates and Lanipuna Gardens residents have been placed on evacuation notice due to the unpredictability of volcanic hazards. American Red Cross and Department of Parks and Recreation shelters are available for your sheltering needs.
  • An emergency water restriction is in effect for Department of Water Supply customers of Leilani Estates Subdivision and below. All residences in the Kapoho area will be affected by this water emergency. Water spigots have been installed near the entrance of Lava Tree State Park and a water tanker has been placed in Vacationland for public drinking water access.
  • Hawaii Fire Department reports extremely dangerous air quality conditions due to high levels of sulfur dioxide gas in the evacuation area.
  • The high levels of sulfur dioxide are a threat to all who become exposed. All are asked to be on the extreme alert to exposure to sulfur dioxide.
  • The area continues to be unstable with volcanic venting and related hazards of earthquake and poisonous gases ongoing. Please heed all advisories.

County, State and Federal partners continue to monitor the situation. You will be informed of any conditions that affect your safety. The next update will be at 8 a.m. or earlier if necessary.

This map shows the locations, mapped by USGS-HVO scientists, of eruptive fissures in the order that they occurred in the Leilani Estates Subdivision as of 10 a.m. HST today (May 5). Eruption updates are posted on HVO's website at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html -- or you can sign up to receive automatic update messages through the USGS Volcano Notification Service at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

This map shows the locations, mapped by USGS-HVO scientists, of eruptive fissures in the order that they occurred in the Leilani Estates Subdivision as of 10 a.m. HST today (May 5). Eruption updates are posted on HVO’s website at volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/k… — or you can sign up to receive automatic update messages through the USGS Volcano Notification Service at volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

This map shows the locations of eruptive fissures in the order that they occurred in the Leilani Estates Subdivision as of 10 a.m. HST today (May 5). The blue lines are paths of steepest descent that identify likely paths of a lava flow, if and when lava moves downhill from an erupting vent. The paths of steepest-descent were calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM) of the Island of Hawai‘i, created from digitized contours. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth's surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate lava-flow paths. The base shaded-relief map was made from the 1983 10-m (DEM). For additional explanation of steepest descent paths, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264. For calculation details, ESRI shapefiles, and KMZ versions of steepest descent paths, see https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/57fd072ee4b0824b2d130eb5.

This map shows the locations of eruptive fissures in the order that they occurred in the Leilani Estates Subdivision as of 10:00 a.m. HST today (May 5). The blue lines are paths of steepest descent that identify likely paths of a lava flow, if and when lava moves downhill from an erupting vent. The paths of steepest-descent were calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM) of the Island of Hawai‘i, created from digitized contours. Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate lava-flow paths. The base shaded-relief map was made from the 1983 10-m (DEM). For additional explanation of steepest descent paths, see pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264. For calculation details, ESRI shapefiles, and KMZ versions of steepest descent paths, see www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/it….

Eruptive fissures and areas covered by lava in the Leilani Estates subdivision, Island of Hawai‘i, are denoted on this satellite image acquired on March 17, 2018 (copyrighted image provided by Digital Globe).

Eruptive fissures and areas covered by lava in the Leilani Estates subdivision, Island of Hawai‘i, are denoted on this satellite image acquired on March 17, 2018 (copyrighted image provided by Digital Globe).

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