Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for April 12, 2018


At 10:28 a.m. HST this morning (April 6), rock falls from the Overlook crater wall into Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake triggered an explosive event. This video, taken by the K2cam, shows a dark pulsing plume of ash and debris. The explosion hurled spatter (molten lava fragments) and lithic blocks (older crater wall) onto the rim at the old visitor overlook and to the southwest. This area is closed to the public due to volcanic hazards such as today’s event. Video taken Friday, April 6, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey


Time-lapse thermal image movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. April 5-12, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. April 5-12, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. April 5-12, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Kīlauea Caldera from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. April 5-12, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO

(Activity updates are written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.)

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake level fluctuated with summit inflation and deflation, ranging about 19–32 m (62–105 ft) below the vent rim. On the East Rift Zone, the 61g lava flow remained active with breakouts on the upper part of the flow field, closer to Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. There were no active lava flows on the pali, coastal plain, or entering the ocean. The 61g flows do not pose an immediate threat to nearby communities.

Mauna Loa is not erupting. Rates of deformation and seismicity have not changed significantly over the past week, but persist above long-term background levels. Only a few small-magnitude earthquakes occurred beneath the volcano, primarily at depths shallower than 5 km (3 mi). GPS and InSAR measurements continue to show slow deformation related to inflation of a magma reservoir beneath the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone.

One earthquake with three or more felt reports occurred on the Island of Hawaiʻi this past week: a magnitude-2.5 earthquake 1 km (0.6 mi) southeast of Captain Cook at 10 km (6 mi) depth on April 09, at 10:02 p.m. HST.

Please visit HVO’s website (volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo) for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea daily eruption updates, Mauna Loa weekly updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Call for summary updates at 808-967-8862 (Kīlauea) or 808-967-8866 (Mauna Loa). Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


Time-lapse movie of Pu’u ‘O’o Crater. April 5-12, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie from a camera positioned on the southeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking toward the active flow advancing to the southeast. The breakout point is at the left edge of the image, and the mid-field skyline at the right is roughly coincident with the top of the pali. April 5-12, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse image movie from a research camera positioned on Holei Pali, looking east towards Lava Flow 61G and Kalapana. April 5-12, 2018. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO

This satellite image was captured on Thursday, April 12, by the Landsat 8 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.   The image shows that breakouts continue in several areas on the flow field. The largest breakout is in the upper flow field, about 1 km (0.6 miles) east of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. The closest breakouts to the coast include a few small areas that are active near the top of the pali.

This satellite image was captured on Thursday, April 12, by the Landsat 8 satellite. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.
The image shows that breakouts continue in several areas on the flow field. The largest breakout is in the upper flow field, about 1 km (0.6 miles) east of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. The closest breakouts to the coast include a few small areas that are active near the top of the pali.

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