Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 30, 2016

June 30, 2016 Lava Over Pali (Full Length Version) from Mick Kalber on Vimeo.

Video courtesy of Tropical Visions Video with air transportation by Paradise Helicopters.


The lava lake at Kilauea’s summit has risen over the past few days, providing improved views of the lake activity. Spattering along the southern lake margin was vigorous this evening, but within the range of normal activity for the lake. Spatter was thrown as high as the Halemaumau Crater floor, about 25 m (80 feet) above the lake surface. This video was taken from the rim of Halemaumau Crater, which is closed to the public due to volcanic hazards. More distant views of the spattering have been possible over the past few days from the public overlook at Jaggar Museum. Video taken Monday, June 27, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse thermal image movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Crater looking Southwest. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park


Time-lapse movie of Kīlauea Caldera from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO

(Activity updates are written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.)

Kīlauea continues to erupt at its summit and East Rift Zone. During the past week, the summit lava lake level varied between about 25 m and 41 m (82–133 ft) below the vent rim within Halema‘uma‘u Crater. On the East Rift Zone, the June 27th lava flow is inactive. The eastern Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō breakout remained active, producing a lava flow (informally called the “61g flow”) that continued to advance to the southeast. As of June 29, 2016, the flow was about 7.3 km (4.5 mi) long. No lava flows were threatening nearby communities.

Mauna Loa is not erupting. Seismicity rates have decreased since the earthquake activity recorded in late May, but remain above background levels. Deformation related to inflation of a magma reservoir beneath the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone continues, with inflation recently occurring mainly in the southwestern part of Mauna Loa’s magma storage complex.

No earthquakes were reported felt on the Island of Hawaiʻi this past week.


Time-lapse multi-image movie of Pu’u ‘O’o Crater. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie from images gathered from a temporary thermal camera looking into Pu’u ‘O’o Crater. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 Celsius (932 Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick fume, image pixel size and other factors often result in image temperatures being lower than actual surface temperatures. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Pu’u ‘O’o Crater East Flank. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie from a camera positioned on the southeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking toward the active flow advancing to the southeast. The breakout point is at the left edge of the image, and the mid-field skyline at the right is roughly coincident with the top of the pali. June 23-30, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO

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