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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 4, 2015


Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. May 28 to June 4, 2015. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse thermal image movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent. May 28 to June 4, 2015. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO


Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Crater from the south rim. May 28 to June 4, 2015. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO

(Activity updates are written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.)

Earthquake waveform on Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 11:59 a.m., HST, at a strength of 3.6 magnitude.

Earthquake waveform on Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 11:59 a.m., HST, at a strength of 3.6 magnitude.

Kīlauea’s summit lava lake level fluctuated over the past week, but remained well below the Overlook crater (vent) rim and out of direct view from Jaggar Museum. On the morning of June 4, the lake was about 49 m (161 ft) below the Overlook crater rim.

Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow continues to feed widespread breakouts northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The active flows remain within about 8 km (5 mi) of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

One felt earthquake was reported on the Island of Hawai’i in the past week. On Sunday, May 31, 2015 at 11:59 a.m., HST, a magnitude 3.6 earthquake occurred 14.4 km (8.9 mi) southeast of Kīlauea Summit at a depth of 8.9 km (5.5 mi).

Visit the HVO website (hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea daily eruption updates and other volcano status reports, current volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kīlauea summary update; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov

Volcano Watch (hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/) is a weekly article and activity update written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey`s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

This satellite image was captured on Saturday, May 30, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. The image is provided courtesy of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.  The image shows that scattered breakouts continue to be active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The farthest active lava in this image is 7.9 km (4.9 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

This satellite image was captured on Saturday, May 30, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA’s Earth Observing 1 satellite. The image is provided courtesy of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds.
The image shows that scattered breakouts continue to be active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The farthest active lava in this image is 7.9 km (4.9 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.


Video courtesy of Tropical Visions Video with air transportation by Paradise Helicopters.

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