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LavaTalk: September 1, 2014 update on Kilauea’s lava flow


Sept. 1, 2014 video of Kilauea’s June 27th Lava Flow


Slideshow progression of Kilauea’s June 27th Lava Flow. Best viewed as a full screen slideshow for detail

This wide view taken Monday (Sept 1), looking west, shows the position of the June 27th flow front relative to the nearby Kaohe Homesteads subdivision. The front of the flow is moving through thick forest, and its position can be seen by the plumes of smoke above the center of the photograph. Near these active surface flows, there was also steaming from a ground crack, resulting from lava deep in the crack. The farthest point of this steaming was 1.7 km (1.1 miles) West of the boundary of the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

This wide view taken Monday (Sept 1), looking west, shows the position of the June 27th flow front relative to the nearby Kaohe Homesteads subdivision. The front of the flow is moving through thick forest, and its position can be seen by the plumes of smoke above the center of the photograph. Near these active surface flows, there was also steaming from a ground crack, resulting from lava deep in the crack. The farthest point of this steaming was 1.7 km (1.1 miles) West of the boundary of the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Lava Flow Update Community Meetings

Hawai’i County Civil Defense and the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will host additional community meetings to update residents on the lava flow in the Wao Kele O Puna area.

  • 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 2, 2014
  • 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 4, 2014

The briefings will be held at the Pahoa High School Cafeteria.


View Pahoa High School Cafeteria in a larger map

This image is from a research camera positioned on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking North. Image taken at 9:38 a.m., Monday, September 1, 2014. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

This image is from a research camera positioned on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking North. Image taken at 9:38 a.m., Monday, September 1, 2014. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Update for Monday, September 1, 2014

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: The June 27th lava flow remains active. During a Civil Defense flight this morning, the farthest part of the flow, which had been spreading in the forest over the past few days, was seen to be spilling into yet another ground crack about 12.6 km (~7.8 miles) from the vent and about 1.9 km (~1.2 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. An HVO flight is scheduled for later today, and an updated flow map and photos will be posted afterward.

Small breakouts also remain active closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, roughly midway along the length of the June 27th flow. None of these breakouts were very vigorous when observed Friday, though some are creeping into forest and producing smoke plumes.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There were minor fluctuations in tilt at Puʻu ʻŌʻō over the past day, with net inflation. Glow was visible overnight above several outgassing openings in the crater floor. The glow above the northeast pit was from a small lava pond, which has persisted since June 27 but is only observable during overflights. The most recent sulfur-dioxide emission-rate measurement for the East Rift Zone was 300 tonnes per day (from all sources) on August 26, 2014.

Summit Observations: Kīlauea’s summit deflated very slightly since yesterday morning. The lava lake did not change level significantly and was roughly 50 m (164 ft) below the Overlook crater rim. There was no significant change in seismicity beneath Kīlauea; seismic tremor at the summit remained low and varied with changes in spattering on the surface of the lava lake. GPS receivers spanning the summit caldera recorded about 5 cm (2 in) of extension between early May and early July. Since then, GPS line length has tracked changes in ground tilt. During the week ending on August 26, 2014, the elevated summit sulfur-dioxide emission rate was measured at 4,100–5,900 tonnes/day (see caveat below), and a tiny amount of particulate material was carried aloft by the plume.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Eruption Update for September 1, 2014

HAWAII ISLAND HUMANE SOCIETY

Unpredictable lava flows in the Puna District have seemingly stalled, however they remind us that upfront planning now can ease stressful situations should there be a need to evacuate. As Benjamin Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

The Hawaii Island Humane Society has a few tips to help keep animals safe in the event of an evacuation:

HIHS encourages all pet owners to be safe and prepared. If you are advised to evacuate, please consider your pet’s safety. Do not leave animals behind.

Develop a plan for their ongoing care including transportation arrangements.

Larger animals including horses and livestock may need to be moved well in advance. Call friends or family members to locate alternate pastures.

Gather items for your pet’s emergency kit –

* Crate
* Leash
* Food
* Water
* Towel
* Identification
* Medication (if applicable)

If you evacuate, arrive at your destination prepared with your pet’s emergency kit and take your pets!

The mission of the Hawaii Island Humane Society is to promote respect for all animals, prevent cruelty to animals, eliminate pet overpopulation, and enhance the bond between humans and animals. HIHS holds a contract with the County of Hawaii to enforce certain animal-related laws and it offers 24-hour service for injured animals and other animal emergencies, humane education classes, low-cost spay and neuter services, lost and found assistance, micro-chipping and more.

For further information, call 808-329-1175 or visit www.hihs.org

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