Categorized | Environment, News, Sci-Tech

Thunderstorm system moving into Central Pacific

20090729_cphc-sat

By Central Pacific Hurricane Center

1. FOR THE CENTRAL NORTH PACIFIC…BETWEEN 140W AND 180

Thunderstorms are periodically flaring along a surface trough located approximately 1500 miles east southeast of Hilo Hawaii. This system is moving to the west at 10 to 15 mph, placing it west of 140W in the Central Pacific Hurricane Center area of responsibility Thursday afternoon or evening. Once in the central Pacific, development, if any, would be slow to occur.

Elsewhere, no tropical cyclones are expected through Friday morning.

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GOES-11 captured the area of thunderstorms on July 29 at 11:00 a.m. EDT. The large cluster of clouds in the lower left side of the GOES satellite image is the area that has a "less than 30 percent chance" of development. Credit: NASA GOES Project

GOES-11 captured the area of thunderstorms on July 29 at 11:00 a.m. EDT. The large cluster of clouds in the lower left side of the GOES satellite image is the area that has a "less than 30 percent chance" of development. Credit: NASA GOES Project

By Rob Gutro, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

On Tuesday, July 28, there were two areas of showers and thunderstorms being watched for potential development in the eastern Pacific Ocean. A day later, on July 29, the only area that has a slim chance of development now lies 1,500 miles east south-east of the Hawaiian Islands.

The area that lost its chance for development was located several hundred miles from Manzanillo, Mexico on July 28, and wind shear has wiped that chance away.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellite, GOES-11 captured an image of the thunderstorms and clouds associated with the area of clouds and showers further out to sea, that has a chance of development. GOES-11 passed over the area on Thursday, July 29 at 11 a.m .EDT. The disturbance is part of a tropical wave moving westward between 10 and 15 mph. The National Hurricane Center gives the area “less than a 30 percent chance” of developing into something tropical.

GOES is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NASA’s GOES Project, located at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates some of the satellite images from the GOES satellites.

Elsewhere in the eastern Pacific tropical cyclone formation isn’t expected for another two days.

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