Categorized | Education, News

Three isle libraries may be closed under BOE proposal

The Board of Education, which oversees operations of state libraries, is considering closing five libraries due to budget cuts.
The state’s library system – which falls under the state’s Department of Education – is facing a $3.6 million shortfall. In addition to possible library closures, 67 vacant positions may not be filled and staff cuts also are on the table. 
Five of the state’s 51 libraries are on the chopping block:
Holualoa Public Library — Big Island
Pahala Public Library — Big Island
Kealakekua Public Library — Big Island
Ewa Beach Public Library — Oahu
Hana Public and School Library — Maui
The board is scheduled to meet again and vote on the proposal Thursday, July 16.
Some see the closures as inevitable.
As one Hawaii247.com reader said:
I think closing libraries is the right choice. If all libraries were to stay open with inadequate staffing, the public service would be sub-par.  I would prefer to fully staff a library so we can give excellent service to the public, despite the fact that they are inconvinienced a little.
The library system has been doing more with less for 15 years and has tried to minimize the impact to the public through out. This time, the public needs to feel the impact because we have no more to give.
 
However, others are rallying to keep the libraries open.
Rep. Denny Coffman:
Aloha,
I wanted to share this important information with you, especially if you and your family use the Holualoa public library.
The State Librarian visited me recently to tell me that they will be recommending closure of the Holualoa library to the Board of Education.  There are a number of reasons for their recommendation, including that Holualoa is only open a few days a week, they have been unable to fill the position of the librarian, and that there is another public library in Kailua-Kona that can serve the Holualoa community.
As we all know, the state faces severe budget cuts across the board, so the closure of underutilized facilities is to be expected, and may, indeed, make sense.  I don’t know if this is the case with Holualoa, however, I think it’s critical that the public voice their concerns to the Board of Education if they feel it’s important to keep the Holualoa public library doors open. 
NOW is the time.
E-mail:  
Board of Education: BOE_hawaii@notes.k12.hi.us 
State Librarian: stlib@librarieshawaii.org                                                          
Rep. Denny Coffman: repcoffman@capitol.hawaii.gov                       
I encourage you to share this information with your friends and family, and feel free to pass along the message to others in the community who may be interested. I just wanted to make sure that people were aware of what’s happening with the library within the time frame that they might be able to affect the outcome.  Mahalo in advance for copying me on your forwarded emails.
Rep. Denny Coffman
Friends of the Library, Kona:
Aloha FOLK Members,
Effective July 1, 2009, the Holualoa Public Library will temporarily close do to budget cuts. This is not being called a permanent closure, but it is not known how many months or years it will take before reopening.
While this will be a loss to the Holualoa community, we encourage patrons to visit the Kailua Kona and Kealakekua Public Libraries in the mean time.  
Their hours of operation can be found here: www.librarieshawaii.org/locati…
We understand that sacrifices must be made to keep a balanced budget, but we feel it should not be at the expense of a community resource such as a public library. A number of people have expressed their concerns over the closure and want to help.  
The Friends of the Library of Hawaii suggest letters be sent to Gov. Linda Lingle. E-mail: governor.lingle@hawaii.gov
Friends of the Libraries Kona will continue to support all three Kona Public Libraries. We all hope Holualoa will open its doors soon and no more public libraries will have to close.
Friends of the Libraries Kona (FOLK)

Media releases compiled by Karin Stanton/Hawaii247.com Contibuting Editor

The Board of Education, which oversees operations of state libraries, is considering closing five libraries due to budget cuts.

The state’s library system – which falls under the state’s Department of Education – is facing a $3.6 million shortfall. In addition to possible library closures, 67 vacant positions may not be filled and staff cuts also are on the table. 

Five of the state’s 51 libraries are on the chopping block:

Holualoa Public Library — Big Island

Pahala Public Library — Big Island

Kealakekua Public Library — Big Island

Ewa Beach Public Library — Oahu

Hana Public and School Library — Maui

The board is scheduled to meet again and vote on the proposal Thursday, July 16.

Some see the closures as inevitable.

As one Hawaii247.com reader said:

I think closing libraries is the right choice. If all libraries were to stay open with inadequate staffing, the public service would be sub-par.  I would prefer to fully staff a library so we can give excellent service to the public, despite the fact that they are inconvinienced a little.

The library system has been doing more with less for 15 years and has tried to minimize the impact to the public through out. This time, the public needs to feel the impact because we have no more to give.

 However, others are rallying to keep the libraries open.

Rep. Denny Coffman:

Aloha,

I wanted to share this important information with you, especially if you and your family use the Holualoa public library.

The State Librarian visited me recently to tell me that they will be recommending closure of the Holualoa library to the Board of Education.  There are a number of reasons for their recommendation, including that Holualoa is only open a few days a week, they have been unable to fill the position of the librarian, and that there is another public library in Kailua-Kona that can serve the Holualoa community.

As we all know, the state faces severe budget cuts across the board, so the closure of underutilized facilities is to be expected, and may, indeed, make sense.  I don’t know if this is the case with Holualoa, however, I think it’s critical that the public voice their concerns to the Board of Education if they feel it’s important to keep the Holualoa public library doors open. 

NOW is the time.

E-mail:  

Board of Education: BOE_hawaii@notes.k12.hi.us 

State Librarian: stlib@librarieshawaii.org                                                          

Rep. Denny Coffman: repcoffman@capitol.hawaii.gov                       

I encourage you to share this information with your friends and family, and feel free to pass along the message to others in the community who may be interested. I just wanted to make sure that people were aware of what’s happening with the library within the time frame that they might be able to affect the outcome.  Mahalo in advance for copying me on your forwarded emails.

Rep. Denny Coffman

And from the Friends of the Library, Kona:

Aloha FOLK Members,

Effective July 1, 2009, the Holualoa Public Library will temporarily close do to budget cuts. This is not being called a permanent closure, but it is not known how many months or years it will take before reopening.

While this will be a loss to the Holualoa community, we encourage patrons to visit the Kailua Kona and Kealakekua Public Libraries in the mean time.  

Their hours of operation can be found here: www.librarieshawaii.org/locati…

We understand that sacrifices must be made to keep a balanced budget, but we feel it should not be at the expense of a community resource such as a public library. A number of people have expressed their concerns over the closure and want to help.  

The Friends of the Library of Hawaii suggest letters be sent to Gov. Linda Lingle. E-mail: governor.lingle@hawaii.gov

Friends of the Libraries Kona will continue to support all three Kona Public Libraries. We all hope Holualoa will open its doors soon and no more public libraries will have to close.

Friends of the Libraries Kona (FOLK)

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