Tag Archive | "volcano watch"

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 2, 2015

Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow continues to feed widespread breakouts northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Active flows are slowly covering and widening the flow field.

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Is there volcanic activity on Venus? This artistic rendering shows how an erupting Venusian volcano might look. Image courtesy of the European Space Agency.

Volcano Watch: Is Earth’s Neighbor Volcanically Active?

Scientists who study Venus have demonstrated convincingly that the planet’s surface has been shaped by active tectonics and volcanic activity.

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Scattered breakouts remain active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō on the June 27th lava flow, but have not advanced significantly over the past month. This photo shows the farthest reach of active lava on the flow field today, which was about 8 km (5 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Minor brush fires were active where lava was entering forest. Photo taken Friday, June 19, 2015 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 25, 2015

Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow continues to feed widespread breakouts northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Active flows are slowly overplating and widening the flow field.

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This 1891 map shows much of the saddle between Mauna Kea (at top of map) and Mauna Loa. Lava flows depicted as black irregular shapes in the lower half of the map were erupted from Mauna Loa, with labeled ages ranging from “ancient” to 1881. The Mauna Kea branch of the 1880–1881 lava flow, visible as a small, thumb-shaped flow at the bottom center of the map, sits atop the much larger 1855–1856 lava flow that also threatened Hilo. To see details of this extraordinary map, go to http://ags.hawaii.gov/survey/map-search/, enter "1718" in the "Registered Map No." box, and click "Search" to open the full resolution map. Map courtesy of Hawaii State Archives.

Volcano Watch: Map and newspaper archives help unravel the eruptive histories of Hawaiian volcanoes

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists extract as much insight as possible from historic accounts of eruptions, and then combine that information with current observations.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 18, 2015

Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow continues to feed widespread breakouts northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

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Looking southwest across the surface of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake on January 23, 1918. Jagged “crags” of stranded, solidified lava rise as much as 30 m (100 ft) above the surface of the lake. A natural levee separates the smooth surface of the active lava lake from overflows of pāhoehoe in foreground. Photo by Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr.

Volcano Watch: Halema‘uma‘u Lava Lake of Old

Although relatively new to most of us, churning lava lakes are certainly not new to Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Indeed, from 1823 through 1924, a lava lake (or lakes) was nearly always present in the caldera, generally inside Halema‘uma‘u.

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One month ago the summit lava lake was at the rim of the Overlook crater (the small crater in the center of the photo), spilling lava onto the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater (the larger crater that fills much of the photo), creating the dark flows surrounding the Overlook crater. Since that time the lava lake has dropped, associated with summit deflation, and today the lake level was about 60 meters (200 feet) below the Overlook crater rim. The stack of recent overflows is visible on the wall of the Overlook crater as the layer of dark lava atop the older, light colored lava forming the majority of the Overlook crater wall. The photo is taken from the southeast rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. The closed Halemaʻumaʻu overlook is in the upper left corner of the photo. Jaggar Museum and HVO can be seen as a small bump on the horizon in the upper right portion of the photograph. Photo taken Thursday, June 9, 2015 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 11, 2015

Kīlauea’s summit lava lake level fluctuated over the past week, but remained well below the Overlook crater rim. Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow continues to feed widespread breakouts northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Active flows remain within about 5 miles of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

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Lobby of the US Geological Survey’s National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado. USGS photo.

Volcano Watch: What does the National Earthquake Information Center have to do with Hawaii?

During Hurricane Iselle, HVO systems were down for several days, during which the NEIC in Colorado backed up HVO’s earthquake monitoring operations.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 4, 2015

Kīlauea’s summit lava lake level fluctuated over the past week, but remained well below the Overlook crater (vent) rim and out of direct view from Jaggar Museum.

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Ashfall damages corn crop in Ecuador following an eruption of Tungurahua Volcano. Photograph courtesy Patricio Ramon, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito, Ecuador.

Volcano Watch: International team visits Hawaii to study impacts of volcanic ash, volcanic gas and lava flows

For the next two weeks, the USGS/HVO hosts scientists from New Zealand and Alaska who are funded in part by a joint U.S. – New Zealand Commission on Science and Technology Cooperation.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 28, 2015

Kīlauea’s summit lava lake level fluctuated over the past week, but remained well below the Overlook crater (vent) rim and out of direct view from Jaggar Museum.

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CROPPED This Voyager 1 image mosaic shows a large area of Io's volcanic plains, with numerous volcanic calderas and lava flows. Loki Patera, an active lava lake 1,000 times large than Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake, is the black horseshoe-shaped feature in the lower part of the image. Credit: NASA/JPL/USGS

Volcano Watch: Active lava lakes are found beyond Earth

Exploration of volcanoes within our solar system has been much like the exploration of Hawaiian volcanoes in the 19th century: sporadic.

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Jul 7, 2015 / 5:15 pm

 

 

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