Tag Archive | "puu oo"

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 22, 2017

On the East Rift Zone, the 61g flow remained active, with lava entering the ocean near Kamokuna.

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Wednesday (February 22, 2017), the breakout along the eastern edge of Kīlauea Volcano's episode 61g flow remains active and had advanced approximately 570 m (620 yards) since it was last mapped on February 14. The flow front consisted of sluggish, oozing pāhoehoe that was approximately 730 m (0.5 miles) from the ocean and 540 m (0.3 miles) from the emergency route road. Channelized lava flows have been recently reported on Pūlama pali, but no active channels were seen by HVO geologists while working in the area this afternoon. They did, however, observe scattered breakouts on the pali. Photo taken Wednesday, February 22, 2017 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for February 23, 2017

The 61g flow was still active, with lava entering the ocean near Kamokuna and surface breakouts downslope of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and on the coastal plain about 730 m (about 0.5 mi) inland of the ocean.

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Lava flow visitors need to be prepared for health and safety

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reports the active lava flow from Puʻu ʻŌʻō in the East Rift Zone is entering the ocean at Kamokuna located within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Additional surface flows are active near Puʻu ʻŌʻō and more recently moving beyond the National Park eastern boundary onto private property near the abandoned Royal […]

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Photo taken Thursday, September 1, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Kilauea’s 61g lava flow continues to carry lava to the ocean

The 61g lava flow, extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō on Kīlauea’s south flank, continues to carry lava to the ocean near Kamokuna.

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On Friday evening, breakouts from the east side of lava flow "61g" provided good viewing for visitors who walked in from the Kalapana viewing area. Photo taken Friday, August 12, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Kilauea 61g lava flow continues spilling into the ocean

The 61G lava flow, extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō on Kīlauea’s south flank, continued to be active and to enter the sea at multiple places near Kamokuna.

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During today's overflight of Kīlauea Volcano's "61g" lava flow, the ocean entry appeared less robust, with only one small flow of active lava streaming over the sea cliff. The second, smaller ocean entry point, west of this main entry (noted in our July 29 photo), was not active at the time of the overflight. Photo taken Tuesday, August 2, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Kilauea’s 61g lava flow ocean entry is slowing, breakouts continue on land

The western portion of the ocean entry was not active during observations yesterday, such that its span was narrowed to about 492 feet since July 29.

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This morning, slow-moving pāhoehoe lava toes and lobes continued to break out from the active flow that crossed the "emergency route" gravel road on Kīlauea Volcano's south flank. Viewing these active breakouts requires a long (8-10 miles, round trip) and hot hike. It is essential for anyone attempting the hike to carry 2-3 quarts of drinking water per person. Sturdy shoes and sun protection (hat, sunglasses, sunscreen) are highly recommended. Early morning or late evening hikers should also carry a flashlight and extra batteries. For more safety info, please visit http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/ and https://www.nps.gov/havo/learn/photosmultimedia/lava-safety-video.htm Photo taken Saturday, July 30, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Visitors to the active lava flow should be prepared for a long, hot and dusty hike

Viewing the active breakouts requires a long (8-10 miles, round trip) and hot hike. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is waiving their entrance fee on Monday (Aug 1) to celebrate the centennial of their establishment.

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Less than 24 hours after first reaching the sea in the early morning hours of July 26, lava spilling over the sea cliff and into the ocean had started building a foundation of loose lava fragments on which a new lava delta can form. Lava deltas are extremely dangerous because they can collapse into the ocean without warning, triggering explosions that hurl rocks on and off shore, and sending waves of scalding water onto the coast. The area of active lava pouring over this sea cliff is about 20 m (66 ft) wide and the cliff is about 20 m (66 ft) high. USGS photo.

Volcano Watch: Beware the perilous beauty of lava entering the ocean

Four main hazards associated with lava flowing into the ocean include the sudden collapse of new land and adjacent sea cliffs into the ocean, explosions triggered by the collapse….

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A faint double rainbow provided a beautiful backdrop for sluggish pāhoehoe lava oozing out from near the flow front this morning. Photo taken Friday, July 22, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVOThe flow was about 615m from the road and 760 m from the ocean.

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō 61G lava flow still active, about 0.45 miles from the ocean

The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō towards the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank remains active. Yesterday, the flow was approximately 0.4 miles from the coastal emergency road and 0.45 miles from the ocean.

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Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō 61G lava flow tip stalls but breakouts still active

The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō towards the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank remains active.

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Tip of 61G lava flow is 0.4 miles from coastal emergency road and is active

As of midday Friday (July 15), the 61G lava flow front was about 730 m (0.4 miles) from the coastal emergency road and 870 m (0.5 miles) from the ocean. The leading tip of the flow was active on Friday and the area around the flow tip has widened.

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Surface breakouts remained active on the pali and coastal plain, but the leading tip of the flow has advanced little since mapping on Sunday. This morning, the flow front was about 940 m (0.6 miles) from the ocean. Activity upslope of the flow front was widening the flow margins. In this photo, the active flow is the lighter colored area Photo taken Tuesday, July 12, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Tip of 61G lava flow front stalls but breakouts widen the flow field

The 61G lava flow, southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō continues to be active on the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank.

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Jul 21, 2017 / 5:15 pm