Tag Archive | "mauna loa"

During the Mauna Loa 1950 eruption, three large, fast-moving lava flows advanced down the west flank of the volcano, each crossing the main highway before reaching the ocean. The Ka‘apuna flow, shown here, traveled from the Southwest Rift Zone vent (7,800 ft elevation) to the coast in just 17 hours, creating a huge steam plume as lava flowed into the sea. The glowing edges and fast-moving channels of the 10- to 25-ft thick ‘a‘ā flow appear white in this June 2, 1950, aerial image. Photo courtesy of Air National Guard, 199th Fighter Squadron.

Volcano Watch: Mauna Loa 1950 eruption – A lot of lava with little warning

Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth, is not erupting, but is stirring. Seismicity remains elevated above long-term background levels, and ground deformation indicates continued inflation of a magma reservoir beneath the volcano.

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One of the new tools deployed by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to better monitor the current unrest on Mauna Loa is a webcam focused on the volcano’s Southwest Rift Zone, which has been the site of eruptions in 1903, 1916, 1919, 1926, and 1950. Webcam images of Mauna Loa’s summit, Northeast Rift, and Southwest Rift (like the one shown here from the morning of February 24, 2016), can be viewed on HVO’s website at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/ USGS image.

Volcano Watch: Mauna Loa – Earth’s largest active volcano is still stirring

Time-lapse multi-image movie of Mokuʻāweoweo Caldera from the Northwest Rim on Mauna Loa. February 18-25, 2016. Images courtesy of USGS/HVO (Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) Despite not being in the headlines, Mauna Loa continues to be in a state of unrest based on […]

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During a kona wind, fume from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō (foreground) and Halema‘uma‘u Crater (background), both on Kīlauea, blows northward, with towering Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea on the horizon. USGS photo.

Volcano Watch: What is a volcano?

To a volcanologist, a volcano is a structure containing a vent or cluster of vents fed by magma rising directly from great depth within the earth.

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IDL TIFF file

Mauna Loa is the largest active volcano on Earth

Mauna Loa last erupted in 1984. In September 2015, volcanologists raised an alert after detecting an increase in the number of shallow earthquakes near the summit and the upper Southwest Rift Zone.

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The Mauna Loa Solar Observatory with Mauna Kea in the background. Photo courtesy of MLSO

Lost hiker rescued on Mauna Loa Sunday (Sept 20)

Rescue crews responded to a 7:18 p.m. alarm Sunday (Sept 20) to Mauna Loa for a lost hiker. A 42-year-old Japanese visitor got lost while hiking on the Mauna Loa trail about 1.5 miles above the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory. The man had been hiking all day, was caught in heavy rain, strong winds and […]

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The four-tiered USGS Volcanic Activity Alert-Notification System uses Volcano Alert Level terms and Aviation Color Codes to inform people about a volcano’s status and potential volcanic ash hazards. For more information about this system, please see http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/. The status of Mauna Loa on the Island of Hawai‘i was recently elevated to ADVISORY/YELLOW. USGS graphic.

Volcano Watch: The Art (and Science) of Assigning Volcano Alerts Levels

This change for Mauna Loa’s status to YELLOW/ADVISORY reflects HVO’s determination that the volcano is showing persistent signs of low-level unrest.

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TOP: Mauna Loa weekly earthquake rates between 2010 and September 17, 2015. Blue bars indicate the number of earthquakes that were located by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory seismic network. Earthquakes of all magnitudes are plotted. Subtle increases in earthquake rates started in mid-2013, while more obvious changes in rates started in 2014. BOTTOM: Change in distance across Mauna Loa's summit caldera between 2010 and September 17, 2015. Blue dots indicate the relative distance between two stations that span the summit caldera of Mauna Loa, shown in the map on the upper left. Sustained extension across the caldera started in mid-2014. This extension is one of the indicators of magma infilling a complex reservoir system beneath the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone.

USGS raises Mauna Loa’s volcano alert level to Advisory status

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have elevated the Volcano Alert Level for Mauna Loa from NORMAL to ADVISORY.

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1950 Mauna Loa eruption. Label on back: “Official Photo, U.S. Air Force.”

Volcano Watch: What happens to lava flows after they enter the ocean?

Does lava continue to flow exactly as it did on land or does it behave differently after it enters the ocean?

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Volcano Watch: Is Mauna Loa gaining weight?

How we use gravity to monitor volcanoes takes advantage of the knowledge that the pull of gravity is stronger when there is more mass beneath the spot where it’s measured.

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This 1891 map shows much of the saddle between Mauna Kea (at top of map) and Mauna Loa. Lava flows depicted as black irregular shapes in the lower half of the map were erupted from Mauna Loa, with labeled ages ranging from “ancient” to 1881. The Mauna Kea branch of the 1880–1881 lava flow, visible as a small, thumb-shaped flow at the bottom center of the map, sits atop the much larger 1855–1856 lava flow that also threatened Hilo. To see details of this extraordinary map, go to http://ags.hawaii.gov/survey/map-search/, enter "1718" in the "Registered Map No." box, and click "Search" to open the full resolution map. Map courtesy of Hawaii State Archives.

Volcano Watch: Map and newspaper archives help unravel the eruptive histories of Hawaiian volcanoes

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists extract as much insight as possible from historic accounts of eruptions, and then combine that information with current observations.

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Volcano Watch: Restless activity beneath Mauna Loa continues

The recent high lava lake levels at Kīlauea Volcano have caught the attention of visitors and kama‘aina alike. But we shouldn’t forget that unrest at Mauna Loa continues.

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The Mauna Loa Solar Observatory with Mauna Kea in the background. Photo courtesy of MLSO

Volcano Watch: Mauna Loa Observatory — The Keeling Curve recognized as landmark science

Continuous CO2 monitoring began on Mauna Loa in 1958, when Charles David Keeling installed state-of-the-art instrumentation high on the remote north flank of the volcano and began carefully measuring the amount of CO2 in the air.

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Apr 29, 2016 / 5:15 pm

 

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