Tag Archive | "lavatalk"

At 7:01 a.m. HST on Thursday, June 8, 2017 a 5.3 magnitude quake struck the south flank of Mauna Loa. USGS Graphic

Volcano Watch: Largest Hawaiian earthquake in a decade reminds us to be prepared

On June 8, 2017, many Island of Hawai‘i residents were awakened by a sharp jolt just past 7 a.m. This 5.3 magnitude natural wake-up call was the largest quake to strike Hawaii in over a decade.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 27, 2017

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake level was relatively stable, ranging 25–30 m (82–98 ft) below the vent rim, with fluctuations in concert with summit inflation and deflation.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 20, 2017

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake fluctuated in concert with summit inflation and deflation, with levels ranging 82–148 feet (25–45 m) below the vent rim.

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Kīlauea Volcano’s Kamokuna ocean entry photographed on May 23, 2017 (left) and July 13, 2017 (right) show how lava flowing from the tube has both widened and thickened the delta. Near the sea cliff, the delta appears to have doubled in thickness over the past seven weeks, creating a distinctly sloped surface from the base of the cliff to the sea. As of mid-July, the Kamokuna lava delta was estimated to be about 1150 feet (350 m) wide and about 6 acres in area. Large cracks on the delta indicate its instability and potential for collapse. USGS photos by L. DeSmither.

Volcano Watch: Kīlauea Volcano’s Kamokuna ocean entry reaches its one-year anniversary

(Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) July 26th marks the one-year anniversary of Kīlauea Volcano’s episode 61g lava flow reaching the sea. And at this time, there’s no indication that the Kamokuna ocean entry will soon end. The story began in late May 2016, […]

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 13, 2017

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake fluctuated in concert with summit inflation and deflation, with levels ranging 26–43 m (85–141 ft) below the vent rim.

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Volcano Watch: New map reveals geologic history of Mauna Loa Volcano’s northeast flank

The new “Geologic map of the northeast flank of Mauna Loa volcano, Island of Hawaiʻi,” is the culmination of many years of work by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) geologists.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 6, 2017

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake fluctuated in concert with summit inflation and deflation, with levels ranging 21–41 m (69–135 ft) below the vent rim.

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During the March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption on Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone, spatter from this line of lava fountains just west of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō reached heights of 40 m (130 ft). Events of the short-lived, but spectacular, fissure eruption are summarized in the March 7, 2013, Volcano Watch article, which is available in the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s Volcano Watch archive (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/hvo_volcano_watch.html).USGS photo by T. Orr.

Volcano Watch: Volcano Watch archive is a treasure trove of volcano information

With over 1,000 articles on almost every volcano topic imaginable, the Volcano Watch archive is a treasure trove of information on Hawaiian volcanoes.

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Photo taken Wednesday, June 28, 2017 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 29, 2017

This past week, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake fluctuated in concert with summit inflation and deflation, with levels ranging 28–52 m (92–171 ft) below the vent rim.

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On the evening of June 30, 2008, littoral explosions at Kīlauea Volcano’s Waikupanaha ocean entry created a fireworks-like display as incandescent fragments of lava flew through the air. When molten lava entered the sea, the water flashed to steam, triggering explosions that hurled spatter and other lava fragments up to heights of 50 m (164 ft). Spatter accumulating on the sea cliff above the ocean entry formed a littoral cone, aglow here from the fallout of still-hot fragments. USGS photo, D. Dow

Volcano Watch: Kīlauea eruptive events rival the excitement of July Fourth fireworks

This week’s Volcano Watch is a photo essay featuring notable images from Kīlauea Volcano’s two ongoing eruptions: Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and Halemaʻumaʻu.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 22, 2017

On the East Rift Zone, the 61g flow remained active, with lava entering the ocean near Kamokuna.

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Left: A color-shaded bathymetry map of Lō‘ihi, a submarine volcano located southeast of the Island of Hawaiʻi. The summit region is marked by pit craters formed in connection with an eruption and earthquake swarm in July–August 1996. Right: Earthquakes in the vicinity of Lō‘ihi (same area as bathymetry map) located by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory during a 30-day period ending June 22, 2017. Locations of the earthquakes are shown with dots; size indicates magnitude and color indicates time (blue represents earthquakes within two days of June 22, yellow within two weeks, and white within four weeks). For example, the blue dot east of Lō‘ihi was a magnitude-2.3 earthquake that occurred on June 22.

Volcano Watch: HVO logs renewed seismic activity at Lō‘ihi

The most recent confirmed eruption of Lō‘ihi occurred in 1996. That year, an energetic earthquake swarm began in July and quickly intensified, motivating a scientific expedition to Lō‘ihi.

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Jul 27, 2017 / 5:15 pm

 

 

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