Tag Archive | "lava"

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for August 25, 2016

Kīlauea continues to erupt at its summit and East Rift Zone. During the past week, the summit lava lake level varied between about 20 m and 40 m (66–131 ft) below the vent rim within Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

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People who venture too close to Kīlauea's Kamokuna ocean entry—by land or by sea—are at risk from multiple hazards associated with lava flowing into the sea. The white plume formed by the interaction of lava and seawater is a corrosive mixture of super-heated steam, hydrochloric acid, and tiny particles of volcanic glass, all of which should be avoided. Lava deltas (new land formed at the ocean entry) can collapse without warning. Should the lava delta shown here collapse, fragments of molten lava and blocks of hot rock would be thrown both inland and seaward, potentially impacting people on the cliff above the ocean entry and in the boat in front of the delta. Photo taken Tusday, August 16, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for August 18, 2016

Kīlauea continues to erupt at its summit and East Rift Zone. On the East Rift Zone, the “61g” flow continued to advance across the coastal plain and enter the ocean.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for August 11, 2016

On the East Rift Zone, the “61g” flow continued to advance across the coastal plain and enter the ocean at multiple points. The lava flow does not pose an immediate threat to nearby communities.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for August 4, 2016

During the past week, the summit lava lake level varied between about 85–135 feet below the vent rim within Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

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The summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater continuously circulates, with lava upwelling on one side of the lake and downwelling on the opposite side, often resulting in vigorous spattering (bright spot on left side of lake). As it circulates, sections of the dark-colored, semi-solid lake surface pull apart, revealing the incandescent molten lava beneath and creating the appearance of a jigsaw puzzle. This evening, the lava lake surface was about 26 m (85 ft) below the vent rim. The silhouette of Mauna Loa is visible in upper right. Photo taken Wednesday, July 27, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 28, 2016

Kīlauea continues to erupt at its summit and East Rift Zone. During the past week, the summit lava lake level varied between about 70–85 feet below the vent rim within Halema‘uma‘u Crater

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Less than 24 hours after first reaching the sea in the early morning hours of July 26, lava spilling over the sea cliff and into the ocean had started building a foundation of loose lava fragments on which a new lava delta can form. Lava deltas are extremely dangerous because they can collapse into the ocean without warning, triggering explosions that hurl rocks on and off shore, and sending waves of scalding water onto the coast. The area of active lava pouring over this sea cliff is about 20 m (66 ft) wide and the cliff is about 20 m (66 ft) high. USGS photo.

Volcano Watch: Beware the perilous beauty of lava entering the ocean

Four main hazards associated with lava flowing into the ocean include the sudden collapse of new land and adjacent sea cliffs into the ocean, explosions triggered by the collapse….

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The active lava flow on Kīlauea Volcano's south flank crossed the emergency access road in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park this afternoon around 3:20 p.m., HST, providing wonderful lava-viewing experiences for Park visitors. A section of the road can be seen here, with fume from the active lava tube in the far distance behind it, and the active flow front in the foreground. The flow front continued to advance, and was less than 100 meters (yards) from the ocean a few hours later (when this photo was taken). The lava flow reached the ocean about 01:15 a.m. July 26. Photo taken Monday, July 25, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō 61G lava flow crosses the coastal emergency road and enters the ocean

The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō entered the ocean, as of as of 1:12 a.m., Tuesday morning, July 26, 2016.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 21, 2016

GPS measurements show deformation of Mauna loa related to inflation of a magma reservoir beneath the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone, with inflation occurring mainly in the southwestern part of the magma storage complex.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 14, 2016

On the East Rift Zone, the “61g” flow continued to advance to the southeast, and, as of July 12, 2016, the leading tip of the flow was about 940 m (0.6 mi) from the ocean.

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The leading tip of the flow has moved only 40 m (130 feet) since yesterday's mapping and the lava activity at the tip was still very weak. The leading lava lobe had a dull surface and rough texture suggesting that it may have cooled somewhat within the flow interior. Photo taken Sunday, July 10, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Lava flow front slows on the coastal plain

The active lava flow southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō continued to move across the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank although progress has been slow during the past two days.

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The hardened crust of this pāhoehoe lava is pushed upward as the flow advances, exposing the incandescent lava beneath. Photo taken Wednesday, July 6, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for July 7, 2016

As of mid-day on July 7, 2016, the flow was about 1.2 km (0.7 mi) from the ocean.

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As Kīlauea Volcano’s active pāhoehoe flow spreads across the coastal plain on July 6, the new lava appeared more shiny or silvery compared with the older lava beneath it. Molten “toes” of lava breaking out from the leading edges of the flow can be seen in the lower right quadrant of the photo. USGS photo.

Volcano Watch: Kīlauea Volcano’s Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō lava flow advances toward the ocean

Today, a new flow from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō is moving to the southeast along the boundary of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and could eventually reach the ocean.

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Aug 31, 2016 / 11:59 am

 

 

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