Tag Archive | "61g flow"

201701-usgs-kamokuna-collapse-t

Volcano Watch: Recent collapses at the Kamokuna ocean entry underscore on-going hazard

Lava deltas are inherently unstable. They are typically built on top of loose rock fragments that form when the incoming lava hits cold ocean water and shatters.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-Tech, VolcanoComments (0)

New lava cascade at Kamokuna in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Monday, January 2. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

New Kamokuna lava ocean entry site open to public Tuesday (Jan 3)

Park rangers opened a newly established lava viewing area at the Kamokuna ocean entry in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Tuesday (Jan 3)

Read the full story

Posted in Education, Entertainment, Environment, Featured, Gallery, Photographs, Sci-Tech, VolcanoComments (0)

Eruption Crew Rangers work to reestablish lava viewing area at Kamokuna. NPS Photo taken Monday, January 2, 2017.

New photos and video show lava pouring from newly exposed sea cliff

Park officials hope to reopen the Kamokuna Lava Viewing Area by noon on January 3, 2017 which will be the 34th anniversary of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō eruption.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Photographs, Sci-Tech, Videos, VolcanoComments (0)

20161231-nps-delta-collapse-01-t

New Year’s Eve delta collapse causes temporary closure at Kamokuna lava ocean entry

Within 15 minutes, the section of cliff where the visitors were standing crashed into the ocean.

Read the full story

Posted in Education, Entertainment, Featured, Sci-Tech, VolcanoComments (0)

20161104-usgs-halemaumau-lava-lake

LavaTalk: Kilauea Volcano status update for Monday (Nov 7)

The elevation of the lake surface is currently still high and was measured at about 12 m (39 ft) below the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. Spattering continues intermittently from various locations along the margins of the lake.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Sci-Tech, Videos, VolcanoComments (0)

Photo taken Thursday, September 1, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Kilauea’s 61g lava flow continues to carry lava to the ocean

The 61g lava flow, extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō on Kīlauea’s south flank, continues to carry lava to the ocean near Kamokuna.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Photographs, Sci-Tech, VolcanoComments (0)

A faint double rainbow provided a beautiful backdrop for sluggish pāhoehoe lava oozing out from near the flow front this morning. Photo taken Friday, July 22, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVOThe flow was about 615m from the road and 760 m from the ocean.

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō 61G lava flow still active, about 0.45 miles from the ocean

The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō towards the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank remains active. Yesterday, the flow was approximately 0.4 miles from the coastal emergency road and 0.45 miles from the ocean.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Photographs, Sci-Tech, VolcanoComments (0)

Surface breakouts remained active on the pali and coastal plain, but the leading tip of the flow has advanced little since mapping on Sunday. This morning, the flow front was about 940 m (0.6 miles) from the ocean. Activity upslope of the flow front was widening the flow margins. In this photo, the active flow is the lighter colored area Photo taken Tuesday, July 12, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Tip of 61G lava flow front stalls but breakouts widen the flow field

The 61G lava flow, southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō continues to be active on the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Photographs, Sci-Tech, VolcanoComments (0)

A wider view of the fume-filled crater at Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The deep hole near the crater rim (see photo at left) is just left of center in this image. Photo taken Friday, July 8, 2016 courtesy of USGS/HVO

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō 61g lava flow continues to advance on the coastal plain

The active lava flow southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō continued to move across the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank. When mapped on Thursday afternoon, the flow front had advanced to about 0.7 miles from the ocean.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Photographs, Sci-Tech, Videos, VolcanoComments (0)

As Kīlauea Volcano’s active pāhoehoe flow spreads across the coastal plain on July 6, the new lava appeared more shiny or silvery compared with the older lava beneath it. Molten “toes” of lava breaking out from the leading edges of the flow can be seen in the lower right quadrant of the photo. USGS photo.

Volcano Watch: Kīlauea Volcano’s Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō lava flow advances toward the ocean

Today, a new flow from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō is moving to the southeast along the boundary of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and could eventually reach the ocean.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-Tech, VolcanoComments (0)


 

 

Become a fan on facebook

Photos on flickr

Stock Quotes

NASDAQ6387.7539  chart-2.2480
S&P 5002472.54  chart-0.91
AAPL150.27  chart-0.07
FB164.43  chart-0.10
GOOG972.92  chart+4.77
INTC34.73  chart-0.02
MSFT73.79  chart-0.43
ORCL50.80  chart-0.33
QCOM53.84  chart-0.13
ALEX42.19  chart-0.17
BOH81.45  chart-0.52
BRN1.85  chart+0.04
BYD25.86  chart-0.12
CAGU0.413  chart+0.000
CPF31.08  chart-0.02
CYAN3.35  chart-0.10
HA45.30  chart-1.00
HCOM29.12  chart+0.09
HE32.76  chart+0.39
MLP17.45  chart-0.20
MRPI0.00155  chart+0.00000
NNUTU2.45  chart-0.05
PLFF0.02  chart+0.00
TBNK30.54  chart-0.13
TSO96.99  chart-0.55
Jul 21, 2017 / 5:15 pm

 

 

Quantcast