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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for Thursday (March 29)

20120329_halemaumau-thermal


Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Overlook Vent, March 23–29, 2012. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 Celsius (932 Fahrenheit) for the camera model used and scales based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame.

(Activity updates are written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.)

Close up of pahoehoe ropes from the tumuli breakout. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Close up of pahoehoe ropes from the tumuli breakout. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

A lava lake present within the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent during the past week resulted in night-time glow that was visible from the Jaggar Museum overlook. The lake, which is normally about 90–115 m (295–377 ft) below the floor of Halema`uma`u Crater and visible by HVO`s Webcam, rose and fell slightly during the week in response to a series of deflation-inflation cycles.

On Kilauea`s east rift zone, surface lava flows were active on the pali and upper coastal plain, in Royal Gardens subdivision, over the past week. As of Thursday, March 29, the flows on the coastal plain had made significant progress towards the coast but were still about 1.6 km (1 mile) from the ocean.

One earthquake beneath Hawai`i Island was reported felt this past week. A magnitude-4.9 earthquake occurred at 10:47 a.m., HST, on Saturday, March 24, 2012, and was located 1 km (1 mi) west of Honomu at a depth of 44 km (27 mi).

Visit the HVO Web site (hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for detailed Kilauea and Mauna Loa activity updates, recent volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kilauea summary; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov

The western branch of the coastal plain flow field is inflated and more active than the eastern branch. Here, a breakout from a tumuli feeds a ropey pahoehoe flow. The fume in the background on the pali marks the lava flow activity that is feeding the coastal breakouts. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

The western branch of the coastal plain flow field is inflated and more active than the eastern branch. Here, a breakout from a tumuli feeds a ropey pahoehoe flow. The fume in the background on the pali marks the lava flow activity that is feeding the coastal breakouts. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO


This movie is created using images from a temporary research camera positioned on the coastal plain, looking towards the pali.

One Response to “Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for Thursday (March 29)”

  1. Erik says:

    That video is really cool – especially the 2nd timelapse.

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